How To Write A Children’s Book In 9 Easy Steps

How-to-write-a-childrens-book

A guest post written by Eevi Jones.

Have you ever wondered how to write a children's book, and if you have what it takes to create one?

For me, it’s this smile. That’s my reason for writing children’s books.

Many aspiring (and even accomplished) authors dream of writing a children’s book.

Maybe you have an incredible idea that you can’t stop thinking about. Or maybe you want to put to paper your little one’s favorite bedtime story–the one you made up while snuggling together. Whatever the reason, now is the time to check this dream off your bucket list.

Writing and publishing your own children’s book is no longer difficult to do, nor is it financially unattainable. You could spend half a fortune just figuring out how to go about all the steps involved, but this article will save you tons of moola and loads of headaches.

Unless you’re a celebrity or have a large following already, self-publishing your children’s book is a great way to get your foot in the door, even if your ultimate goal is to get published the traditional way. If you present a well-performing book and an established author platform, your chances of landing a publishing deal are much higher than if you simply submit a query or manuscript.

Here’s a roadmap to outline the steps we’ll take to walk through how to publish a children’s book:

how-to-write-a-children's-book-roadmap

STEP 1. CHOOSE YOUR CHILDREN’S BOOK FORMAT

Should you publish an ebook or paperback?

Actually, consider both.

While ebooks are not the largest medium used by smaller children and their parents yet, its usage has consistently grown. Most parents still prefer their kids to read print books, but the number of parents who prefer ebooks or who have no preference is increasing.

Ebooks also come in handy during promotions and review requests. Giving away ebook review is a lot easier and more cost-effective.

STEP 2. WRITE A BOOK FOR CHILDREN, NOT ADULTS

You may be tempted to think that writing a book is the same whether for kids or grown-ups. This couldn’t be further from the truth, as both the style and type differ greatly.

Australian author Mem Fox sums it up perfectly:

“Writing a picture book is like writing ‘War and Peace’ in Haiku.”

You may be an excellent writer, an engaging blogger, maybe even an already accomplished author of adult fiction or nonfiction. But when it comes to writing for children, we have to adopt a new mindset and put ourselves in the shoes of those we want to write for.

Children’s books cover many years of our little ones. These are the years they develop cognitively the most, so each stage requires a different structure and setup of our books. Adapting to each stage and its cognitive ability is important if we want our book to be meaningful, educational, and fun.

STEP 3. NARROW DOWN YOUR BOOK CATEGORY

Most children’s books fall into one of these six categories:

  • Board books
  • Picture books
  • Trade books
  • Chapter books
  • Middle grade chapter books
  • Young Adult books

The division is mainly based on the targeted age group, the average number of pages, the number of images, and the overall word count.

Below is a table to show these average statistics for the most common types of children’s books:

Children's Book Categories

CategoryAgeWord CountPagesIllustrations
Picture Book0-3032Every Page
Young Picture Book2-5200-40032Every Page
Trade Picture Book4-8400-80032+Every Page
Picture Story Book6-101,000-3,00032+Every Page
Chapter Book6-103,000-10,00032+Almost Every Page
Middle Grade Book8-1215,000-40,0008212+ Illustrations

 

These outlined differences make your decision of which age group you are planning to write for very important, as every subsequent decision will depend on the type of book you choose to write.

It’s a great idea to find a book (or a few) similar to what you have in mind, and use the word count, number of pages, and number of illustrations as a guide for your own book.

The website Renaissance (for teachers) is a great resource for researching the word count of published books.

A great way of figuring out what is trending in children's books, and how much money one could make, is using Publisher Rocket.  Just type in a children's book idea and you can quickly see how many people are searching for those books on Amazon, the average amount of money made by the top books, and even the competition:

This data was created using Publisher Rocket.

As you can see, some kids book genres have decent money coming into them, with less competition.  So, make sure you do your research before hand and see what possible types of kids books you can create.

STEP 4. REALLY GET TO KNOW YOUR TARGET AUDIENCE

Writing for children brings a completely new set of challenges–something an author for grown-up fiction and nonfiction doesn’t have to be concerned about.

In essence, the book will have to appeal to two completely separate and different groups of people:

  1. The children that consume the book, and
  2. The grown-ups that purchase and read the book with their kids

The age of the main buyer of children’s books is between 30 and 44. Females make up more than 70% of these buyers.

A few ways you could really get to better know your audience are:

  • Spend time with age groups you’re targeting
  • Talk to parents and teachers
  • Give a survey to women within the target age range from your own social circles

Remember, your book will have to please parents and teachers just as much as children.

To learn more about children’s books and their unique setup, you could:

  • Study books that fall into your targeted age group. What is the general layout?
  • What vocabulary is used?
  • Visit a bookstore or library and browse through the kids’ section to get a feel for this genre.
  • Search for age group trends and consumer trends in general via sites like Slideshare
  • Or frequent the US Census that provides detailed demographic data.

Why am I telling you all of this? I believe that setting this very basic foundation of knowledge on the differences of audiences will set you miles and miles apart from those who simply start writing a children’s book. Having a general idea about who purchases, reads, and consumes the books you’re planning to write will help you reach and address your target audience.

STEP 5. CHOOSE A WRITING STYLE (AND STICK WITH IT)

Your writing style will depend greatly on the age group you are writing for, the associated word count, the story you’re telling, and, of course, your own preferences. Here are some styles worth considering:

  1. RHYME: If you decide to write your book in rhyme, you need to make the rhyme very, very good. Make sure lines have the same syllable counts and rhythms. Don’t force bad rhymes or skip rhyming. Be persistent. And consistent. The Little Blue Truck and Llama Llama books are excellent examples.
  2. PAST OR PRESENT TENSE: Kids prefer books in the present tense, as it actively engages them in the story. They’re experiencing it as it happens, rather than being removed from something that happened in the past. If, however, you’re telling a story that is specific to a certain event or time, you might want to tell it in past tense because it’s a finite event that took place once upon a time. Maisy books are a great present-tense example.
  3. FIRST OR THIRD PERSON: Whose point of view is the story told from? This is one of the most important decisions an author has to make. Is the main character the central focus on every page, with everything happening to them? Is it helpful to see the events that are happening through their eyes? If yes, then the first person might be a good choice. If not, a third person narrator’s voice may give you more freedom and flexibility.

There is no right or wrong approach; it’s simply a question of style. Once you have chosen your style, however, you will need to stick to it throughout the book.

STEP 6. INCLUDE IMPORTANT ELEMENTS OF A CHILDREN’S BOOK STORY

Your unique and inspired story idea is only as strong as the way in which you tell it. Good stories are carefully designed and tend to be simple.

It’s all about composition. There’s a beginning, a middle, and an end. There are actions, scenes, and emotions. And be sure to be clear about your core message.

The Most Important Elements of a Children's Book

As mentioned in my book How To Self-Publish A Children’s Book, the elements aren’t always the same, but here are the five most often used:

  1. Unforgettable characters: The best characters have strong personalities, make bold moves, and go after their dreams against all odds. Children fall in love with them and want to be like them. Children want to be able to relate to the character in some way. Almost every person has felt like an outsider or has had their morals questioned. In general, they also relate to kids that are just a bit older than them. Characters who remind kids of themselves are the most memorable.
  2. Suspenseful action/hook: Many authors shy away from beginning their story with an action, such as a shocking or unexpected event, but this is a very effective way to draw in young readers. Consistent action throughout your story is key, as it will hold the reader’s attention. Chapter books, for example, usually end each chapter with a cliffhanger, to ensure the reader keeps turning the pages.
  3. Realistic dialogue: Children like to read stories that sound like they talk. Listen to conversations you hear around you; none of them will sound like the nicely flowing, full sentences you learned to write in school. Make sure you’re using age-appropriate language that kids will understand and relate to. If you are unsure about the language level of your target audience, be sure to spend time with kids of that particular age. Go to libraries, visit friends with kids, or simply read children’s books to get a feel for the language used.
  4. Storyline: Be sure to provide obstacles and challenges for your characters; some sort of escalation. Also, note that little ones like happy endings and a solution to a problem. If your story lacks a happy ending, you risk upsetting the reader or leaving them dissatisfied.
  5. The instant recall factor: You want your book’s character to remain in the minds of your little readers long after they’ve read your book. If kids ask to read it over and over again, you can consider your story a success.

While the sequence and rhythm of events is very important, please keep in mind that not all stories have the same structure. There is no one formula because following a formula would rob stories of their true potential. Yes, it’s important to have an intentional structure, but if it doesn’t fit, don’t force it.

STEP 7. HOW DO I NAME A CHILDREN'S BOOK

Once your story is written, it’s time to think about a winning title for your children’s book!

You may already have a title for your book in mind. In fact, it’s probably something you’ve been thinking long and hard about for some time.

Yes, we want a clever title that lets your story’s personality shine through. But something we want just as much (if not more) is for readers to actually find your book! And this will be very hard to do if you don’t name it properly.

Dave’s article How To Title A Book is excellent for helping you craft your perfect title.

STEP 8. DO I NEED AN EDITOR FOR A CHILDREN’S BOOK?

Editing is a valuable investment. A good editor is instrumental in making your book a success because poor spelling, grammar, and book structure will reflect badly on your book’s sales and reviews.

Your book and its message might be amazing, but if too many errors slip through, your readers will notice and voice their opinion in a review like this, which ultimately will lower your overall rating.

why-editors-important-write-children's-book

If your book is more than 600-800 words long, you should send it off to a professional editor for proofing. Yes, you can go over it yourself and let your significant other read through it. But letting a third unbiased, independent, and professional party look over it will make your manuscript so much better, given you have an experienced editor.

To find a great editor, read Dave’s Mastery Guide To Selecting The Best Book Editor.

STEP 9. ILLUSTRATE YOUR CHILDREN’S BOOK

When it comes to illustrating your children’s book, there are three options you can choose from. The best option for you will depend on your budget, time, skill level, and trust you’re willing to put into someone else's interpretation of your story.

Your choices are:

  1. Do it yourself
  2. Hire someone
  3. Combination of both

Next, you’ll need to…

1. DECIDE ON THE BOOK’S ORIENTATION:

When it comes to picture books, there are a number of different orientations to choose from. (These don’t apply to chapter books or books for older children, as those usually feature the 5½” x 8” format.)

There is no set rule, of course. Rather, it’s an oversimplified observation.

how-to-write-a-children's-book-physical-layout

This decision needs to be made early on because your illustrations will depend greatly on the orientation you choose for your book.

2. PLAN YOUR IMAGE SIZING

Whether you hire an illustrator or create the illustrations yourself, you’ll want to make sure you do the sizing correctly so that once you upload your artwork, everything runs smoothly.

CreateSpace’s available print sizes will depend on whether your book is going to be in color or black and white. Below are the most common sizes.

  • 5.5” x 8.5”
  • 6” x 9”
  • 6.14 x 9.21”
  • 7” x 10”
  • 8” x 10”
  • 8.5” x 8.5”
  • 8.5” x 11”

If you plan on having your images cover the entire page, make sure to add 0.125 to the top and bottom, as well as one side to account for trimming. CreateSpace offers templates here, but remember that you’ll still have to add the bleed allowance yourself.

Here is a quick example from my book The Little Mower That Could. Let’s say you want your book to be 8.5” x 8.5”:

  • Add 0.125 to the top, bottom, and one side
  • Image size with bleed should be 8.63” x 8.75” (w x h), (or 2589 pixels x 2625 pixels at a resolution of 300 pixels/inch)
  • *This is only necessary for interior pages if the art covers the ENTIRE page

The larger your image, the better – at least 2,500 pixels per side, preferably larger. Take printing into account. For example, if your book will be 11” on one side, your images need to be more than 3,300 pixels per side. Just make sure the aspect ratio remains the same if you should decide to resize your images.

Here’s a great Inches-to-Pixels and Pixels-to-Inches converter so you know how large your image should be depending on your selected trim size. Be sure to select a DPI (Dots Per Inch) of 300.

3. CREATE A STORYBOARD / BOOK DUMMY

How do we decide what to include in the illustrations on each page?

And how can we make sure the images match up with the text?

That’s where a storyboard or book dummy comes in.

There are many different ways to use this technique, and I'll share what works best for me:

For picture books, I usually like to work backward. Now that you’ve written your story, this will be easy to do.

Remember – this is not the final layout. This is just meant to help you determine which illustrations you would like to include so that you can get ready to find and hire an illustrator. This step is also helpful if you are planning to create your illustrations yourself.

  1. You already know how many pages your book will have. You’ll use this information to evenly distribute the text throughout that number of pages. Let’s say you have 32 pages (15 double-page spreads plus 2 single pages). It’s helpful to create an actual dummy to help us with the next steps. Here’s how:

  1. Print out your manuscript and divide the text into 15 parts.
  2. Cut and paste them into the book dummy you created, one part per double-page spread.
  3. Flip through each page, read your pasted text, and think of an illustration that would go nicely with that particular text
  4. Start sketching on the page opposite to your pasted text.

This storyboard creation process doesn’t have to be perfect. You just want to get the essence of the story right, so be loose and expressive, and have some fun. In the end, you’ll probably create a few different versions, each being an improvement of the previous one.

4. CHOOSE TEXT AND ILLUSTRATION COMBINATIONS

How you combine your text and illustrations is really a design question and completely up to you. However, it's a crucial element on how to write a children's book. And because the creation process depends on your chosen combination, you will have to decide in advance so you can let your illustrator know.

There are two ways of combining text and illustrations:

  1. Putting text as part of the image
  2. Setting text and image separate

TEXT AS PART OF THE IMAGE:

Having the text in the image itself makes formatting much easier, as you don’t have to worry about page breaks or font sizes. It will also look consistent across different devices.

I usually use this method for my full-color children’s books. You can use whatever font you want, and the text can go anywhere on the page, making it fun and engaging for little ones’ eyes.

Below (left) is a page from my book The Garbage Trucks Are Here, and on the right is a page from my book A Gemstone Adventure. Here, I have added a layer underneath the text to make it stand out from the background.

text-illustration-layout-how-to-write-a-children's-book

If you decide to include the text in the image itself, this will have to be done by your illustrator. Or, if you feel your skills are up to it, you can add the text yourself once you receive the finished images, using simple graphics software.

Bear in mind that this method does make editing the text a bit harder – any changes or corrections have to be made within the image itself.

TEXT AND IMAGE SEPARATE:

The other option is to have the images and text separate, with the text either below the illustration or on a separate page. Below is a double-page spread from my chapter book series The Amulet Of Amser. It has an image on the left-hand page and the text on the right-hand page.

Here, the layout would be arranged by the book formatter (or yourself) and does not involve your illustrator.

5. CHOOSE AN ILLUSTRATOR

Here’s a short list of outsourcing sites where you can find an illustrator for your book:

Social media sites (children’s book specific):

The outsourcing sites mentioned above are great for multiple reasons. First, most provide you with reviews from the artist’s previous clients. Some even include information about previous completion rates (something I really pay attention to).

And most importantly, these sites are cost-effective. You have to weed through the profiles a bit, but if you find the perfect illustrator who offers the style you’re going for, the research will be worth it.

What to Learn How to Sell Your Childrens Book?


Get Access to the Free Course Here

HOW TO POST YOUR PROJECT

On most outsourcing sites mentioned above, you will need to post your project (similar to a job offering), and illustrators will then bid on it.

In order to get an idea of how much you should be offering, browse some of the platform’s current projects. Know that your bid sets a baseline only, as each illustrator will bid individually on your project if he or she is interested in working with you.

Bonus: To get you started with your illustrator search, I’ve created swipe files that you can use to post your Illustrator Project Description into any of the previously suggested sites. You can download it here

After the initial bidding process (usually a couple of days), you will have to go through each illustrator’s profile and portfolio to decide who would be a great fit. The first time you go through this weeding-out process, you’ll eliminate those you don’t plan on hiring.

To see if an illustrator is a great fit, I recommend you go through a vetting process.

  1. Look at their profile and read through previous reviews
  2. View their portfolio to get a feel for their style
  3. Request a sample of their work so you can see how effectively they can turn your writing into illustrations, and how well they follow instructions. To view an example of such a request, click here.

6. PAYING FOR ILLUSTRATIONS

In order to get a feel for acceptable prices for a project, I recommend browsing the outsourcing site to find postings for similar projects. I’m refraining from including actual prices, as those differ greatly from service provider to service provider, and also change over time.

When hiring an illustrator via one of these outsourcing sites, payments are generally released based on milestones that you get to set. For example, you may release the first milestone payment after the storyboard has been submitted. The milestone setup will depend on the scope of your project and the platform you are using to hire your illustrator.

The cost of your illustrator depends on multiple things:

  • Number of illustrations – the more you need, the more you’ll pay.
  • Complexity of the artwork – using watercolors will be more time consuming and cost more than purely digitized images, for example. The simpler your illustrations, the more you’ll save.
  • Illustrator’s skill level and experience
  • Location of the illustrator -usually, artists located in Western Europe, the U.S., Canada, and Australia will charge more than artists in Asian or Eastern European Countries
  • Delivery speed  – the more quickly you require your artwork, the more it generally costs to move you up in the illustrator’s drawing queue.

7. AGREEING TO WORK TOGETHER

Once you select the best-fitting illustrator for your project, you’ll want to make sure to request the following:

  1. Signed art release form. This will only be relevant if you decide to hire an illustrator directly. Any art attained via the outsourcing sites listed above should already provide that any commissioned work will automatically become the intellectual property of the buyer.
  2. High-resolution images (300 dpi) with the proper sizing.
  3. Raw files of all image. This will enable you to make changes directly to your illustrations.

FAQ FOR ASPIRING CHILDREN’S BOOK AUTHORS:

1. Should I copyright my children’s book?

The answer to whether or not you should copyright your children’s book is entirely up to you. Just know that under U.S. copyright law, you already own your written work the instant you write it down. If, however, you still feel copyrighting your work would be beneficial to you, you can do so right here.

2. What should I not do when writing a children’s book?

In this article, we’ve talked a great deal about some of the things we should do and pay attention to when writing our children’s book. But what are some things we should avoid doing when working on our book?

Kids are very perceptive. They smell an agenda miles away. That’s why it’s very important to not sound preachy or instructive in our story. Weaving our lessons into the story will always outshine finger-wagging ones, ensuring that kids want to read our book over and over again.

Depending on the age group you’re writing your children’s book for, you want to be careful not to leave the problem of the story unsolved. Kids, especially smaller ones, like a solution to an introduced problem. So to make the reading of your story a pleasurable experience, we want to make sure to provide them with an actual and satisfying ending.

Children love a routine. And routines are based on repeating patterns. The key to routines or patterns is not to break them. And the same holds true for children’s books. Once we’ve established a pattern (be it in form of a rhyme, a repeating phrase, or a character’s behavior, for example), we want to try our best to stick to it.

3. Is there a tool I can use to convert my children’s book into an ebook version?

There are many ways to go about creating your ebook version for your children’s book. But one of the quickest and easiest ones is the use of Amazon’s Kindle Kids’ Book Creator.

While I use other methods as well, I love working with and recommending this simple yet powerful tool. It is absolutely free and specifically meant to help you create an ebook version for your illustrated children’s book. It allows you to import your artwork, add text, and create Kindle Text Pop-Ups. And the best part is that there’s no HTML/CSS knowledge required.

4. Should my children’s book have a subtitle?

As I share in my book How To Self-Publish A Children’s Book, making use of a subtitle can be very beneficial marketing-wise.

Giving your children’s book a subtitle provides you with an additional opportunity to use your keywords, key phrases, or synonyms that potential readers might be using when searching for a children’s book like yours.

And using a subtitle also allows for a bit more creative freedom with our actual title. So if our title itself doesn't bring the topic of the book across, we’ll have our subtitle as a backup.

5. How do I write a children’s book description? (link to description generator)

Just like with books of other genres, your book description is very important to the success of your children’s book.

While your cover and title help with your book’s discoverability and grabbing a potential buyer’s attention, your description (or blurb) is often the reason a reader decides to buy (or not to buy) your book.

To get a feel for what makes a great blurb, be sure to look at some similar books to yours. Pay special attention to length, word choice, and the style they are written in. That’s usually a great way to see what your audience expects and is used to.

And to help you with the formatting of your blurb, be sure to check out Dave’s amazing Book Description Generator that takes care of all the text formatting for you.

6. What category should my children’s book be in?

This is such an important question. During the setup of your children’s book, you may have noticed that children’s book categories are usually not offered as an option. And that’s because some of Amazon’s categories have to first be ‘unlocked’ before they can be selected by authors.

To learn how to do this, be sure to read Dave’s article on How To Unlock Secret Categories. This right here will be such a game-changer for you and your children's book.

7. What is the best cover design for my children’s book?

To get the best cover design you can for your children’s book, follow this guide for making standout book covers, and then create a book mock up for your book marketing efforts.

Creating a children’s book only takes 9 simple steps:

  1. Choose your children’s book format
  2. Write for children, not adults
  3. Choose a book category
  4. Know your target audience
  5. Select a writing style
  6. Set up the elements of your children’s book story
  7. Perfect your children’s book title
  8. Edit your children’s book
  9. How to have your children’s book illustrated

And That’s How to Write a Children’s Book

There you have it! Follow this guide and you will have a beautiful story tailored toward your audience AND the illustrations to go along with it.

Children value creativity and individuality. There is no one way to draw. No one way to paint. No one way to write. It’s about being uniquely you, lending your unique voice to your unique story.

That’s why you shouldn’t be afraid of the way YOU write and YOU draw because that’s what sets you apart. Diversity is important. Tell YOUR story.

I hope you derived tons of value on how to make your children’s book.

If you’d like to expand your knowledge on how to:

  • Format Your Paper & Ebook Versions of Your Book Step-by-Step
  • Publish Your Paperback and Ebook, and
  • Market Your Freshly Published Children’s Book

then check out my book How To Self-Publish A Children’s Book – Everything You Need To Know To Write, Illustrate, Publish, And Market Your Paperback And Ebook.

Writing a Children’s Book that Sells

Writing a children’s book is one thing; writing a children’s book that sells is another. Follow along as I take you through some easy steps to writing a children's book that actually makes sales. I will also show you different resources that will come in handy when writing your children's book — such as how to find illustrators who can bring your words to life.

Want more videos like this? Then click HERE to subscribe to my YouTube channel.

About the Author: Eevi Jones

Eevi Jones is an award-winning and 7-time bestselling children’s book author, and the founder of Children’s Book University, where she teaches loving moms, dads, grandparents, and teachers how to write & publish their own magical story.

She’s been featured in media outlets such as Forbes, Scary Mommy, Huffington Post, Exceptional Parent Magazine, and more.

 

181 Comments

  1. Caroleann Rice on September 29, 2020 at 2:34 am

    Wonderful post Eevi 🙂 Thanks for sharing this article.

    Animal Characters in Children’s Literature comprises various bodies of work made especially for children. This consists of picture books and easy-to-read stories for the entertainment and development of children. Children love books not only…

    Please read my blog: Animal Characters in Children’s Literature

    Have a wonderful day!

    • Eevi Jones on October 16, 2020 at 11:07 pm

      Thanks so much for your kind words and for sharing, Caroleann!

  2. valerie baker on September 26, 2020 at 7:47 am

    this was so helpful, quick question, should the story be told by the child, 2-5 years is target book age, or by the adult

    • Dave Chesson on September 26, 2020 at 1:49 pm

      It can be. That’s more of a stylistic choice. Just make sure that you vernacular is of a 2-5 year-old level.

  3. Chandese Watts on July 28, 2020 at 1:15 am

    Great read thank you kindly.

    I’m wanting to find out how illustrations are done and then put into digital print? I have found an illustrator and written a handful of books. We are both new to this so trying to find the best way of transforming the illustrations and text together to look like a professional book.

    • Chris-Chigozirim on August 1, 2020 at 2:14 pm

      Thank you for giving me a great start to writing, publishing and selling children’s books.

      • Dave Chesson on August 2, 2020 at 1:05 pm

        Glad we could help!

      • Eevi Jones on October 16, 2020 at 9:03 pm

        We’re so excited to see what you come up with, Chris!

    • Eevi Jones on October 16, 2020 at 9:02 pm

      Hi Chandese! Please feel free to check out my book “How To Self-Publish A Children’s Book” or visit my website. I share a number of resources on just that. I so hope this helps!

  4. Dr. Fauzia Mushtaq on July 20, 2020 at 5:17 am

    Hi Eevi,
    Great content, superb article. Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge.
    This is Dr. Fauzia from Pakistan I would be really grateful if you can share information about vocational books for children, like skill based books for kids, like planting, flowering, kitchen gardening, crafts making etc. Another request is I really want to write small books on skill development in children but need guidelines.
    Hope you will respond.
    Thanking in Advanced.
    Best Regards
    Dr. Fauzia Mushtaq
    Lahore Pakistan

    • Eevi Jones on October 16, 2020 at 11:04 pm

      Hi Dr. Fauzia Mushtaq! Thanks so much for your kind words! Please feel free to check out my book “How To Self-Publish A Children’s Book” or visit my website, where I share a number of resources on just that. I so hope this helps!

  5. Janet Councilman on July 15, 2020 at 1:51 am

    Thanks for this great article!
    Writing for children involves a lot of considerations: consider what children like; what they would feel; how they would read your book; and more.

    • Dave Chesson on July 15, 2020 at 2:39 pm

      Absolutely!

    • Eevi on July 16, 2020 at 5:48 pm

      Yes! I so love that you’re thinking this way! That’s why it is so very important to know what age group you’re writing for and what you’re trying to achieve with your beautiful book! Thanks so much for your wonderful comment, Janet!

  6. Chris M Dreyer Jr on June 4, 2020 at 10:06 am

    Thank you for this article, it has very helpful information. I have a question though… Are there any rule changes for an ESL story book? My wife is an English teacher and wants me to use my art and poetry to write language books for her students learning the language. Thank you in advance for taking the time to respond!

    • Eevi on June 7, 2020 at 3:16 am

      Hi Chris! Thanks so much for reaching out. You’d create your ESL book the same way. The way I’d go about it is to go and see what other ESL story books look like. Look at commonalities, such as the size and the format. Perhaps even purchase a few, so you figure out your own preferences. I hope this helps, Chris! Good luck with your book!

  7. Yvette T on May 17, 2020 at 4:41 pm

    This was so informative! it answered questions. I didn’t know I had, a great resource. I cannot wait to start writing my children’s book 🙂

    • Tracy on May 26, 2020 at 6:38 pm

      I cannot thank you enough for all of this information. I have been working on a book intended as a personal present and I’ve almost finished. The only trouble is when I do any mock-ups for printing, my borders are all wrong, so your information on how much to allow for trimming is wonderful. Thank you again!

      • Eevi on June 3, 2020 at 8:11 pm

        How wonderful, Tracy! And what a thoughtful gift. I’m so glad I was able to help!

    • Eevi on June 3, 2020 at 8:09 pm

      I’m so happy to hear you found this so informative, Yvette! I wish you so much fun with the creation of your very own children’s book!

  8. Linda on May 17, 2020 at 9:36 am

    Great article! It was very simple to read and answered all of the questions I had. You took a very intimidating process and broke it down in a clear way that now makes me excited to start. Thank you!

    • Eevi on June 3, 2020 at 8:12 pm

      I’m so excited to hear this, Linda. Thank so much for your kind words. Here’s to a wonderful and creative journey!

  9. Peter Jok on May 9, 2020 at 5:13 pm

    I am happy for great guide I will start my children book soon thank

    • Dave Chesson on May 9, 2020 at 8:20 pm

      Awesome and best of luck!

    • Eevi on May 12, 2020 at 10:03 pm

      We can’t wait to see what beautiful story you’ll come up with, Peter!

    • Pam on May 14, 2020 at 10:10 pm

      This is a wonderful article that contains so much helpful information. I am writing a story about two grandmothers and an adventure they have with animals in a foreign country. I know that usually a child is the protagonist, but I think our two colorful grannies and their adventures will hold a child’s attention…. But would I be making a mistake to write a picture book for children from 4-8 or so that does not have a child in it? How hard fast is the rule about needing a child to be a main character in the book?

      • Eevi on June 3, 2020 at 8:16 pm

        Thanks so much for reading the article and for reaching out, Pam. Given that your book is written and meant for children, I would try to include a character little ones can identify with. I so can’t wait to see what you create, Pam!

  10. Verna Rochon on May 3, 2020 at 12:28 am

    Eevi, you have definitely place all the “need to know” information together in one place. Publishing a children’s book series to leave as a legacy to my grandkids has been a dream and goal of mine, and now I’m pursuing this goal. Thank you so much for this “how to guide”, it is saved, bookmarked and will be used as a reference for my step by step into this new venture. Thank you so much and congratulations and prayers for your continued success.

    • Eevi on May 12, 2020 at 10:02 pm

      Thanks so much for your kind words, Verna! I’m so happy to hear you found this article so helpful. I just know your grandkids will love your children’s book, and can’t wait for you to get started!

  11. Sarah Rok on April 2, 2020 at 9:29 pm

    I am in the process of writing a children`s book age group 1-3 year old is there a minimum page count for books, regardless if it is a cloth book, touch and feel book or hard copies.

    • Eevi Jones on April 10, 2020 at 1:51 pm

      Hi @sarahrok ! If you’re planning to publish your book with KDP, then the current minimum page count would be 24 for your paperback. I hope this helps!

  12. stuart on March 2, 2020 at 4:04 am

    So good….I’ve hd this children`s story inside of me for 12 years. Now I am finally beginning to “sketch”it out. This was so helpful to begin. I wish I could illustrate !!!Signed, In gratitude, A retired Episcopal priest who has been telling stories for many years–even to my own children.

    • Eevi Jones on March 3, 2020 at 9:17 pm

      I’m so happy this helped and inspired you! I cannot wait to see what you create!

      • stuart on March 4, 2020 at 1:21 am

        Thank you.

        • Eevi Jones on March 6, 2020 at 12:45 am

          Thanks so much for asking. I’m currently not hosting any live workshops, but if you need more help, please feel free to visit me over on my website http://eevijones.com/

      • stuart on March 4, 2020 at 7:39 pm

        I lived in Georgetown for 23 years and now (as of 2017) live near the Washington National Cathedral. Do you ever hold workshops / presentations in the greater Washington area?

  13. Obioha Godspower Livingstone on December 23, 2019 at 5:47 pm

    This is a great write up. Am going to hit this goal in 2020:Write Great books for Kids.

    • Eevi Jones on February 18, 2020 at 8:50 pm

      Thanks so much, @obiohagodspowerlivingstone ! I’m excited to hear that you’re making the writing your own children`s book one of your 2020 goals!

  14. Yna Isabelle Flores on December 17, 2019 at 8:21 am

    Hi Eevi! Awesome blog you’ve got here It is very detailed I love it! I’m a freelancer myself I love to blog or write I just got my job through this

    • Eevi Jones on February 18, 2020 at 8:51 pm

      Thank you for your kind words, @ynaisabelleflores ! I’m so happy to hear you loved reading it!

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  16. Shravan on September 22, 2019 at 3:28 pm

    Love this article.. I’ve been thinking about writing a children`s book for my 3 yr old just as a fun exercise but this article opened my eyes to writing it for all kids.. Thank you sooooo much Eevi..

    • Eevi Jones on October 20, 2019 at 1:55 am

      I’m so happy to hear you loved this article, @shravangowrishankar . Writing for this age group is my absolute favorite, so I’m excited to hear that you’d like to give it a try!

  17. Jadira Serrano on September 4, 2019 at 1:30 am

    Hello, is there anyway of having a private conversation with you? I have so many questions.

    • Eevi Jones on October 20, 2019 at 1:52 am

      Hi @jadiraserrano ! I do offer Ask-Me-Anything sessions every once in a while. Feel free to check for available times right here: http://www.eevijones.com/co…. I hope this helps! Thank you so much for asking!

  18. Nicole Stiles on August 3, 2019 at 11:45 am

    Thanks so much for this article! I started thinking this morning about writing a baby book after realizing how much my own baby likes books. She has a favorite page or two from a couple of her books that contain some type of exaggeration when being read, she loves it. She’ll give me a book over and over and over to reread to her and quickly flip the book to her favorite pages. I’d love to write something where she loves every page, not just a few.

    • Dave Chesson on August 3, 2019 at 11:56 am

      Absolutely and It is even better when they realize you wrote it – brings a big smile to both faces 😉

    • Eevi Jones on October 20, 2019 at 1:54 am

      Oh, I love hearing that your little one loves reading books! And being able to read her your very own would be so, so very special! Thanks so much for sharing this!

  19. Janet Davies on July 8, 2019 at 7:41 pm

    I’m an artist wondering if I can write the story to go with my illustrations and some characters I have created. This is a great article, thanks. I am dyslexic too, so the words will be harder than the illustrations.

    • Eevi Jones on July 10, 2019 at 2:57 am

      Oh, absolutely! Just be sure to have a specific age group in mind before you’re writing your story, and try to stick to the industry`s standards that I shared in the article, such as the word count. And be sure to have an editor look over your finished script, especially since you mentioned that the writing part might be a bit trickier for you.And thanks so much for your kind words. I’m so happy to hear you found this article helpful!

      • Janet Davies on July 10, 2019 at 6:15 am

        Thanks for getting back to me Eevi. I used to volunteer to give reading lessons at our primary school. The books had far less words than those recommended in the standards. I guess that was because they were written for early reading. I will have to increase the number of words I was planning on.

  20. Paul O'Brien on May 8, 2019 at 11:36 am

    Hi all
    I’m starting to write my first ever fiction book and I’m looking for guidance from experienced writers on how best to construct the story.
    I’m currently brainstorming with ideas and logging them, as well as inventing characters, locations and back stories etc.
    I’ve also started to write the first few chapters through eagerness.
    What is the prescribed or accepted way to construct the story? Is it to start by to write the story which is in my head and introduce characters, lands and other requirements as I go, or get everything written down in more detail and then start to write?
    Please help.
    Paul

    • Eevi Jones on June 11, 2019 at 6:12 pm

      Hi @OB1429 ! I’m so happy to hear you’re writing your first fiction book for children! First, I’d try to get clear on the age group you’d like to write for. That will help greatly with the overall layout of your book, as you’ll know how long your story should be word-count wise.Other than that, there are no real rules on how to go about this. When writing my middle grade chapter books, for example, I like to divide my story into 10-12 short chapters. Knowing my overall word count (see table above), I then divide that word count by the number of chapters.Then I create the outline of my story, using my chapters and the approximate word count within each chapter as my guide.But again, it is entirely up to you how you go about writing your story. Just make sure you know your target audience BEFORE you start writing your book. I hope this helps! Happy writing, Paul!

  21. EMMANUEL ILLESCAS on May 6, 2019 at 4:28 pm

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  22. Poonam Gupta on April 11, 2019 at 7:25 am

    Dear Eevi, this is a great guide specially for people like me who are planning to dip their toes in the field of writing books. For first timers like me, this is an excellent step-by-step guide. I wanted to know, whether it makes sense to show my content to someone in the beginning, to know whether it makes sense for a book?

    • Eevi Jones on April 28, 2019 at 10:20 pm

      Hi! I’m so happy you found this article so helpful! Getting feedback on your story is definitely something I would recommend. During the 1-on-1 feedback sessions I offer, for example, I let my clients know whether or not the word count as well as the difficulty level of the used vocabulary are appropriate for the age group they wish their story to be for. And we work on how to improve the story to make it as beautiful as it can possibly be. When booking such a feedback session, just make sure you’re working with someone that has worked with children`s books before, as they are very different from other genres! I hope this helps, Poonam!

  23. Chris Solomon (he/him) on March 21, 2019 at 9:28 pm

    I’ve never written something and finished it or have not written a child`s book

  24. Chris Solomon (he/him) on March 21, 2019 at 9:21 pm

    i do not get it I”m writing a book for my high school assignment i do not even know what vocabulary to use or how to start ehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

    • Eevi Jones on April 28, 2019 at 10:24 pm

      Hi Chris,
      The first thing I would ask myself is what age group I’d like to write for. Being clear on your target audience will determine every subsequent step you’re going to take. So let`s say you’re planning to write a story for 4-8 year olds. Based on my table above, your story should then be about 400-800 words long.Once you’ve written your story, I would highly recommend ‘testing’ it on someone your target age, in order to see how a little one that age reacts to it. I hope this gets you started, Chris. Good luck with your assignment!

  25. George on March 12, 2019 at 1:17 am

    I have written two middle grade books so far but hardly any sales. After reading this post I realized I have to adjust my content and Illustration to make my books more compelling. Thanks for the input.

    • Eevi Jones on March 16, 2019 at 2:42 am

      You’re so very welcome, @georgegijo . I wish you the very best for your two middle grade books!

  26. Kathleen McCabe on February 16, 2019 at 2:58 pm

    Eevi, Thank You so much for a thoroughly informative to-do list for the journey!!

    • Eevi Jones on March 10, 2019 at 5:23 pm

      You’re so very welcome, @kathleenmccabe !!! I’m so happy to hear you found this helpful!

  27. Rob snell on January 26, 2019 at 2:55 am

    This is perfect. I ‘m just starting my first children ‘s book and the information is perfect thank you so much.

    • Eevi Jones on February 15, 2019 at 7:01 pm

      I’m so happy to hear you found this helpful.

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  29. Inga Karlsson on December 3, 2018 at 6:11 pm

    I’m new at this but I have a great story in my head. Little unsure of the age group but I’m wondering if I go for a Chapter Book vs Middle Grade book how many chapters should be made of those 32+ / 82 pages? Is there a tip on this. I mean should a chapter not be longer than this or that amout of words? And also: How many chapters are standard or best or recommended in those two age cathegories I’m reffering to?
    Also, since I’m green at this, my logis says I must first structurize every chapter briefly, include the forward going plot and have all that finished before I write the story for every chapter. Am I right? Do you have tips or links for this structurization process? Am I at the right track with my thinking? I do not wanna kill the flow in the writing process but sure there must be some structure, forwardgoing basic plot, chaptersetting and wordlength first?

    • Eevi Jones on December 27, 2018 at 1:51 pm

      Hi Inga!
      Thanks so much for reading this article and for reaching out! The answer would depend on the age group you’re planning to write for! I’d suggest you go and check out some current chapter and middle grade books to see what would best for you. A chapter book, for example generally has around 10 chapters. With a total of 3,000 – 10,000 words, that’d be 300 – 1000 words per chapter.If you’d like more guidance, I do have a chapter book structure template in my book How to Self-Publish a Children`s Book. You can download the template here: http://www.eevijones.com/book-downloads/Wishing you all the best, Inga! And happy holidays!

  30. Chelsea Pyne on November 17, 2018 at 2:08 pm

    Great info, thank you! You say that for an 8.5 x 8.5 book, add 0.125 to the top, bottom, and one side. Image size with bleed should be 8.63  x 8.75  (w x h)… is that something the illustrator needs to add to the drawing, or the author when I upload the book?

    • Eevi Jones on December 27, 2018 at 1:52 pm

      Hi Chelsea! It is something the illustrator needs to already add to the drawings. That way It is ready to go when it comes to formatting your book. I hope this helps, Chelsea! Good luck!

  31. Michelle on October 14, 2018 at 2:12 pm

    I definitely want to start a children ‘s book . I have lots of learning to do after I type it out . I ‘m so determined.it has a great meaning behind it .

    • Eevi Jones on October 31, 2018 at 4:14 pm

      These types of stories are the best! I’m so very excited for you! Let this drive and determination push you into fulfilling your dream of writing and publishing your beautiful children`s book!

  32. Sinnie Kylie Currie on September 30, 2018 at 9:45 am

    Thank you for the info. I want to write a book for my 4year old daughter. I actually have 4 stories to put into books. They’re about her, things she loves, has done etc. I have the titles, pictures, picture ideas and know the stories etc. My struggle is writing the the books in words etc that that suits her age.

    • Eevi Jones on October 31, 2018 at 4:13 pm

      Hi @sinniekyliecurrie ! I love that you want to write a book for your daughter! My suggestion would be to look at books that are similar to the ones you want to write. Either look at those that your daughter owns already, or look in bookstores or libraries. You will want to make sure you’re looking at books for her age group. Pay special attention to the overall length of the text. What is the overall word count? How long are the sentences and paragraphs? How descriptive is the language.Use words and phrases your daughter and her friends are using. One thing I always suggest to my students and clients is to take your finished story and read it to the age group your book is for. Kids usually ask if they do not understand something, which in turn provides you with the opportunity to adjust your wording and/ or vocabulary in your story.I so hope this helps, Sinnie. I’m so very excited for you!

  33. Sameeha MJ on September 5, 2018 at 9:45 am

    Hi,
    May I know when this article was written? I need to cite it for my thesis,thank you.

    • Dave Chesson on September 5, 2018 at 11:55 am

      Jan 16, 2018 @ 05:00

      • Sameeha MJ on September 6, 2018 at 1:57 am

        Thank you.

        • Dave Chesson on September 6, 2018 at 12:51 pm

          Absolutely and glad to have helped. Good luck with the thesis!

  34. Barbara Grace on July 3, 2018 at 12:19 am

    Brilliant article Eevi, lots of strategy tips and solid info. Thanks for sharing 🙂

    • Eevi Jones on July 10, 2018 at 5:58 pm

      You’re so, so welcome, Barbara! Thanks so much for your sweet comment!

  35. Lisa Rothstein on May 20, 2018 at 2:53 am

    What a great article. Thanks for laying it out so clearly. I’ve been wanting to write and illustrate a children`s book series for a long time. I thought it would be a picture story book but now I think it might make a better chapter book.

    • Dave Chesson on May 21, 2018 at 2:07 am

      Awesome – yeah, she`s a really good writer.

      • Eevi Jones on July 10, 2018 at 5:57 pm

        Thanks, Dave 🙂

    • Eevi Jones on July 10, 2018 at 5:57 pm

      Thanks so much, Lisa! I’m so happy to hear that this article provided some clarity! A chapter book series sounds fantastic!

  36. D. Takara Shelor on February 2, 2018 at 7:44 pm

    Fabulous article. I’ve been toying with a children`s book series idea and even have an illustrator lined up. But I’ve never published fiction before and felt a bit overwhelmed about what to do. This is perfect.

    • Eevi Jones on February 4, 2018 at 4:13 am

      Thank you so much for saying so, D.! I love hearing that you already have an idea for your children`s book series in mind! 2018 might just be the year to bring it to paper! I’m so excited for you!

  37. D. Takara Shelor on February 2, 2018 at 7:44 pm

    Fabulous article. I’ve been toying with a children’s book series idea and even have an illustrator lined up. But I’ve never published fiction before and felt a bit overwhelmed about what to do. This is perfect.

    • Eevi Jones on February 4, 2018 at 4:13 am

      Thank you so much for saying so, D.! I love hearing that you already have an idea for your children’s book series in mind! 2018 might just be the year to bring it to paper! I’m so excited for you!

  38. Anne Copeland on January 26, 2018 at 3:15 am

    Thank you for this excellent article. I have two different children`s books, Tenshoes and the Skittyfoot for the younger ones about 4 – 6 or so and a little older ones – 6 – 8, That dog, Liver! At least that is how I have figured the age groups in the past. After reading this article, I can make some changes in both books with my idea for illustrations and some of the writing to make them more saleable. Thank you so much. Both my books have positive life lessons for children. This is a great help for sure.

    • Eevi Jones on January 26, 2018 at 6:30 pm

      Oh, I love hearing this Anne! Thanks so much for sharing your takeaways and what steps you’re going to implement. I wish you nothing but the best for your children`s books!

  39. Anne Copeland on January 26, 2018 at 3:15 am

    Thank you for this excellent article. I have two different children’s books, Tenshoes and the Skittyfoot for the younger ones about 4 – 6 or so and a little older ones – 6 – 8, That dog, Liver! At least that is how I have figured the age groups in the past. After reading this article, I can make some changes in both books with my idea for illustrations and some of the writing to make them more saleable. Thank you so much. Both my books have positive life lessons for children. This is a great help for sure.

    • Eevi Jones on January 26, 2018 at 6:30 pm

      Oh, I love hearing this Anne! Thanks so much for sharing your takeaways and what steps you’re going to implement. I wish you nothing but the best for your children’s books!

  40. SciFi_Fantasy Girl on January 21, 2018 at 6:43 pm

    Thanks, Eevi – what a great article! Very comprehensive and informative; so much easier to make a decision now:-)

    • Eevi Jones on January 22, 2018 at 12:55 am

      I’m so happy you found this article informative, SciFi_Fantasy Girl! I hope it nudged you toward writing your own children`s book 🙂 I know you can do it!

  41. SciFi_Fantasy Girl on January 21, 2018 at 6:43 pm

    Thanks, Eevi – what a great article! Very comprehensive and informative; so much easier to make a decision now:-)

    • Eevi Jones on January 22, 2018 at 12:55 am

      I’m so happy you found this article informative, SciFi_Fantasy Girl! I hope it nudged you toward writing your own children’s book 🙂 I know you can do it!

  42. Gil B. on January 18, 2018 at 10:53 pm

    Eevi, this is awesome! My children ‘s books is 99% ready for Kindle and definitely going to use this info for the printed version…

    • Eevi Jones on January 19, 2018 at 3:41 am

      That is amazing, Gil! I’m so excited for you! Thanks so much for your kind words!

  43. Gil B. on January 18, 2018 at 10:53 pm

    Eevi, this is awesome! My children’s books is 99% ready for Kindle and definitely going to use this info for the printed version…

    • Eevi Jones on January 19, 2018 at 3:41 am

      That’s amazing, Gil! I’m so excited for you! Thanks so much for your kind words!

  44. Lorraine on January 18, 2018 at 2:27 am

    Eevi, What an absolutely excellent guide to write children books.
    Brilliant! Thank you for so generously sharing your expertise!

    • Eevi Jones on January 18, 2018 at 3:43 am

      These are the kindest words, Lorraine! Thank you so very much!

  45. Lorraine on January 18, 2018 at 2:27 am

    Eevi, What an absolutely excellent guide to write a children books.
    Brilliant! Thank you for so generously sharing your expertise!

    • Eevi Jones on January 18, 2018 at 3:43 am

      These are the kindest words, Lorraine! Thank you so very much!

  46. Shearin on January 18, 2018 at 1:52 am

    What an excellent article for aspiring children`s book authors! My husband and I just joined Self Publishing School today to get the guidance we need to write and publish a successful children`s book for our brand. Just this article alone has so much valuable information, and knowing it is coming from a successful children`s book author gives me even more confidence in the content. Thanks Eevi! 🙂

    • Eevi Jones on January 18, 2018 at 3:45 am

      I’m so happy you find this information valuable, Shearin! I’m really looking forward to seeing what you and your husband are coming up with for your wonderful children`s book!

  47. Shearin on January 18, 2018 at 1:52 am

    What an excellent article for aspiring children’s book authors! My husband and I just joined Self Publishing School today to get the guidance we need to write and publish a successful children’s book for our brand. Just this article alone has so much valuable information, and knowing it is coming from a successful children’s book author gives me even more confidence in the content. Thanks Eevi! 🙂

    • Eevi Jones on January 18, 2018 at 3:45 am

      I’m so happy you find this information valuable, Shearin! I’m really looking forward to seeing what you and your husband are coming up with for your wonderful children’s book!

  48. Jo Dibblee on January 17, 2018 at 8:17 pm

    Perfect timing … as I am finishing the adult version of my book and see an excellent opportunity to create a children`s book to accompany or stand alone. I have written and published three adult non-fictions so far all have been international best seller and two have been internally awarded …children books are very different so this is fabulous. thank you

    • Eevi Jones on January 18, 2018 at 1:15 am

      You are so welcome! What a wonderful concept, Jo! I cannot wait to see what you come up with! Congratulations on your international best sellers! These are incredible achievements!

  49. Jo Dibblee on January 17, 2018 at 8:17 pm

    Perfect timing … as I am finishing the adult version of my book and see an excellent opportunity to create a children’s book to accompany or stand alone. I have written and published three adult non-fictions so far all have been international best seller and two have been internally awarded …children books are very different so this is fabulous. thank you

    • Eevi Jones on January 18, 2018 at 1:15 am

      You are so welcome! What a wonderful concept, Jo! I cannot wait to see what you come up with! Congratulations on your international best sellers! These are incredible achievements!

  50. Leo Hartas on January 17, 2018 at 4:20 pm

    An excellent article. I have been working as a children`s illustrator for over 30 years and I’m occasionally approached by self publishing writers interested in me illustrating their books. What I think the article misses is the relative importance of the illustrations and how collaborating with an illustrator from the start as an equal partner would improve the quality of the final book considerably.Most self published children`s books look awful because the writer has no understanding of how good art is created, that it takes time and costs real money. I now collaborate with my writer friend in a wonderful equal partnership where we plan books from the start together and share the money we make. It is great because we both feel fully invested and I am motivated to do my best work.

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 5:53 pm

      I so appreciate your valuable feedback, Leo! Collaboration between the illustrator and writer is essential.I think being able to come together to plan a book in its entirety from the very start would be the ideal setup for a successful children`s book. It is wonderful to hear that you’re working with your writer friend in an equal partnership to both accomplish your very best.

    • Martin Tejeda on December 2, 2019 at 3:19 pm

      too much.

  51. Leo Hartas on January 17, 2018 at 4:20 pm

    An excellent article. I have been working as a children’s illustrator for over 30 years and I’m occasionally approached by self publishing writers interested in me illustrating their books. What I think the article misses is the relative importance of the illustrations and how collaborating with an illustrator from the start as an equal partner would improve the quality of the final book considerably.

    Most self published children’s books look awful because the writer has no understanding of how good art is created, that it takes time and costs real money. I now collaborate with my writer friend in a wonderful equal partnership where we plan books from the start together and share the money we make. It’s great because we both feel fully invested and I am motivated to do my best work.

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 5:53 pm

      I so appreciate your valuable feedback, Leo! Collaboration between the illustrator and writer is essential.

      I think being able to come together to plan a book in its entirety from the very start would be the ideal setup for a successful children’s book. It’s wonderful to hear that you’re working with your writer friend in an equal partnership to both accomplish your very best.

  52. Candyce Ossefort-Russell on January 17, 2018 at 3:59 pm

    Wow! This post is excellent. I cannot believe how much powerful information is jammed into this free article. You’re great, Eevi!

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 5:02 pm

      Many, many thanks, dear Candyce! I’m beyond happy to hear how powerful you find this article!

      • Omowa on March 31, 2020 at 12:28 pm

        Give it to Eeviiiiii! Fantastic guide!

  53. Candyce Ossefort-Russell on January 17, 2018 at 3:59 pm

    Wow! This post is excellent. I cannot believe how much powerful information is jammed into this free article. You’re great, Eevi!

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 5:02 pm

      Many, many thanks, dear Candyce! I’m beyond happy to hear how powerful you find this article!

  54. Elsa Mendoza on January 17, 2018 at 2:56 pm

    This is such an excellent article! Now, no more excuses not to write a children ‘s book. All the steps and tips have been generously provided. Thank you, Ms. Eevi Jones👍

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 5:01 pm

      Thanks so, so much for saying so, Elsa! Your words truly mean so much to me!

  55. Elsa Mendoza on January 17, 2018 at 2:56 pm

    This is such an excellent article! Now, no more excuses not to write a children’s book. All the steps and tips have been generously provided. Thank you, Ms. Eevi Jones?

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 5:01 pm

      Thanks so, so much for saying so, Elsa! Your words truly mean so much to me!

  56. Jaye on January 17, 2018 at 4:16 am

    Must pull out that children`s book. Thanks for a very clear useful outline!

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 5:00 pm

      YAY! Love hearing this, Jaye! I so cannot wait to see what beautiful story you’ll come up with!

  57. Jaye on January 17, 2018 at 4:16 am

    Must pull out that children’s book. Thanks for a very clear useful outline!

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 5:00 pm

      YAY! Love hearing this, Jaye! I so can’t wait to see what beautiful story you’ll come up with!

  58. Tracie Strucker on January 17, 2018 at 2:10 am

    Eevi, this is wonderful! You’ve made it so easy to write a children`s book, step by step. Thanks so much!

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 2:31 am

      Thanks SOOO much for saying so, Tracie! I’m so very thankful for your support!

  59. Tracie Strucker on January 17, 2018 at 2:10 am

    Eevi, this is wonderful! You’ve made it so easy to write a children’s book, step by step. Thanks so much!

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 2:31 am

      Thanks SOOO much for saying so, Tracie! I’m so very thankful for your support!

  60. Emma Lundwall on January 17, 2018 at 1:33 am

    Wow! What a fantastic article – so much helpful information here, thank you for sharing, this will help so many people!

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 2:32 am

      Thank you for your kind words and for checking it out, Emma!

  61. Emma Lundwall on January 17, 2018 at 1:33 am

    Wow! What a fantastic article – so much helpful information here, thank you for sharing, this will help so many people!

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 2:32 am

      Thank you for your kind words and for checking it out, Emma!

  62. Magnus Dunning on January 17, 2018 at 12:59 am

    Incredibly detailed and comprehensive article. cannot wait to buy the book.

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 1:07 am

      Thanks so much, Magnus!!!!

  63. Magnus Dunning on January 17, 2018 at 12:59 am

    Incredibly detailed and comprehensive article. Can’t wait to buy the book.

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 1:07 am

      Thanks so much, Magnus!!!!

  64. Amy McTear on January 17, 2018 at 12:53 am

    Great, Eevi! It is def on my bucket list to write a children`s book. Thank you for laying it out so clearly!

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 1:08 am

      Oh, I love hearing this, Amy!!! I cannot wait to see what you’ll come up with! Thank you so much!

  65. Amy McTear on January 17, 2018 at 12:53 am

    Great, Eevi! It is def on my bucket list to write a children’s book. Thank you for laying it out so clearly!

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 1:08 am

      Oh, I love hearing this, Amy!!! I can’t wait to see what you’ll come up with! Thank you so much!

  66. CindyYantis on January 17, 2018 at 12:43 am

    What an excellent informational article! I’m definitely bookmarking for when I’m ready to take that step. Thanks, Eevi!

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 1:11 am

      I’m so happy to hear this, Cindy! Thank you so, so much for having taken the time to read and comment!

  67. Susan Jagannath on January 16, 2018 at 11:35 pm

    wow – excellent write up! Obviously a professional and so ready to share..awesome combination. I see a string of bestsellers in your future!

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 12:13 am

      You’re too kind, Susan! Thank you so, so very much!

  68. Susan Jagannath on January 16, 2018 at 11:35 pm

    wow – excellent write up! Obviously a professional and so ready to share..awesome combination. I see a string of bestsellers in your future!

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 12:13 am

      You’re too kind, Susan! Thank you so, so very much!

  69. Jeffrey Matteis on January 16, 2018 at 8:51 pm

    Such a wonderful and comprehensive post! I love the creativity that goes into crafting a children`s book… It is almost like a short film.

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 12:14 am

      I love how you’re describing the creative process, Jeffrey! Thank you so much!

  70. Jeffrey Matteis on January 16, 2018 at 8:51 pm

    Such a wonderful and comprehensive post! I love the creativity that goes into crafting a children’s book… it’s almost like a short film.

    • Eevi Jones on January 17, 2018 at 12:14 am

      I love how you’re describing the creative process, Jeffrey! Thank you so much!

  71. Jessica Smith on January 16, 2018 at 5:25 pm

    Great detail with the information! Thank you so much for getting all of this information in one place!

    • Eevi Jones on January 16, 2018 at 5:32 pm

      Thank you SOOO much, Jessica! I’m so grateful for your incredible support!

  72. Jessica Smith on January 16, 2018 at 5:25 pm

    Great detail with the information! Thank you so much for getting all of this information in one place!

    • Eevi Jones on January 16, 2018 at 5:32 pm

      Thank you SOOO much, Jessica! I’m so grateful for your incredible support!

  73. Kelly Walk Hines on January 16, 2018 at 5:19 pm

    This is a great article, the information is invaluable, i definitely am looking forward to your next book as i have value you as an author!

    • Eevi Jones on January 16, 2018 at 5:33 pm

      I’m so humbled by your incredible support, Kelly! Thank you so, so much!

  74. Kelly Walk Hines on January 16, 2018 at 5:19 pm

    This is a great article, the information is invaluable, i definitely am looking forward to your next book as i have value you as an author!

    • Eevi Jones on January 16, 2018 at 5:33 pm

      I’m so humbled by your incredible support, Kelly! Thank you so, so much!

  75. Paul B Welling on January 16, 2018 at 3:43 pm

    Eevi, this is awesome material! Makes me think even I could publish a children`s book. Such great detail and content. Thanks for sharing.

    • Eevi Jones on January 16, 2018 at 5:08 pm

      How amazing would this be for you and your kids, Paul?! I know you could so do this! Thank you so, so much!

  76. Paul B Welling on January 16, 2018 at 3:43 pm

    Eevi, this is awesome material! Makes me think even I could publish a children’s book. Such great detail and content. Thanks for sharing.

    • Eevi Jones on January 16, 2018 at 5:08 pm

      How amazing would this be for you and your kids, Paul?! I know you could so do this! Thank you so, so much!

  77. Bento Leal on January 16, 2018 at 3:35 pm

    Excellent how-to steps! My sister has been wanting to write a children`s book for years — this will be very helpful for her. Thanks for sharing!

    • Eevi Jones on January 16, 2018 at 3:39 pm

      Thanks so much, Bento! That is wonderful to hear! I cannot wait for your sister to start writing her own children`s book!

  78. Bento Leal on January 16, 2018 at 3:35 pm

    Excellent how-to steps! My sister has been wanting to write a children’s book for years — this will be very helpful for her. Thanks for sharing!

    • Eevi Jones on January 16, 2018 at 3:39 pm

      Thanks so much, Bento! That’s wonderful to hear! I can’t wait for your sister to start writing her own children’s book!

  79. John Mashni on January 16, 2018 at 3:33 pm

    This is incredible info. Thank you so much for putting this all together!

    • Eevi Jones on January 16, 2018 at 3:40 pm

      You’re so very welcome, John! I’m so happy to hear you find this valuable! Thanks so much!

  80. John Mashni on January 16, 2018 at 3:33 pm

    This is incredible info. Thank you so much for putting this all together!

    • Eevi Jones on January 16, 2018 at 3:40 pm

      You’re so very welcome, John! I’m so happy to hear you find this valuable! Thanks so much!

  81. Jim Molinelli on January 16, 2018 at 3:13 pm

    Wow! I never knew there was so much detail that went into writing books for children! What a wonderful article sharing your expertise on the entire process! You really have presented an immense amount of valuable information. Thank you so much!

    • Eevi Jones on January 16, 2018 at 3:41 pm

      Thank you so much for your incredibly kind words, Jim! I’m so happy to hear you find this information valuable.

  82. Jim Molinelli on January 16, 2018 at 3:13 pm

    Wow! I never knew there was so much detail that went into writing books for children! What a wonderful article sharing your expertise on the entire process! You really have presented an immense amount of valuable information. Thank you so much!

    • Eevi Jones on January 16, 2018 at 3:41 pm

      Thank you so much for your incredibly kind words, Jim! I’m so happy to hear you find this information valuable.

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