Book Copyright Page Examples For Your eBook

Copyright-Examlpes-for-Ebook-Front-Page

Most self-publishers get intimidated when it comes to making their first book copyright page. I understand – the small print and legal jargon were enough to make me squimish as well.

But it doesn’t have to be that way. Today I'll not only provide you with an example book copyright page you can just copy and use but also explain each one of the important parts to your copyright page like the all rights reserved statement, important copyright text, etc.

After reading this article, you’ll be able to quickly and confidently prepare your own book copyright pages from here on out, and thus, protect yourself and your works from book piracy.

In this lesson, you will learn:

  • How to build an ironclad book copyright page
  • The necessary components to a copyright page
  • How to get ISBNs, CIPs, and more

Plus, you can always just access my free copyright example, and be well on your way.

Quick Disclaimer: Thank god I never became a lawyer…that might have been rough for many of us.  But keep that in mind as you read this.  And that's it for my CYA statement.

So, let's begin!

Free Book Copyright Page Example

If all you need is a book copyright page to copy and paste into your book, here it is.  You have my permission to use it as you like.  Just make sure to change the appropriate information so as to fit your needs.

Writer’s Writing Buddy by Tiana SiedschlagPublished by Cornerstone Writers Group200 Lakerose RoadMary Lake, MT 03789

www.CornerstoneWriters.com

© 2017 Tiana Siedschlag

All rights reserved. No portion of this book may be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except as permitted by U.S. copyright law. For permissions contact:

help@CornerstoneWriters.com

Cover by Justin Reber.

Ebook ISBN: 359-2-85933-609-1

However, if you'd like to know more about each part of the above copyright page, or you have questions about how you should change it to fit your situation, you can reference the below parts.

Components to a Book Copyright Page

Generally, the more specific information you put on your copyright page, the more protection you and your book will have.  However, this doesn't mean you need to go overboard and hire a lawyer to create your copyright page.  So, stand down Saul.

Instead, to have a legitimate copyright page, all you need is:Copyright pages will help you to not need a lawyer

  1. The Copyright Statement or Notice
  2. “All rights reserved.” (or similar text)

Yeah…that's really it.

However, there are a couple more elements that you should consider when creating your copyright page:

  1. Publisher’s Name & Address
  2. Ordering Information
  3. Printing Details and Trademarks
  4. Your Website
  5. CIP Data Block
  6. Edition
  7. ISBN(s)
  8. Disclaimers
  9. Giving Credit
  10. Printing Numbers (and/or years)
This is the CYA to your Self-PublishingClick To Tweet

Don't worry, I know that looks crazy but take solace in the fact that we'll cover the area below.

1. The Copyright Statement

The copyright statement or notice includes these three elements:

  1. The symbol ©, or the word “Copyright,” or the abbreviation, “Copr.”
  2. The first year of publication
  3. The name of the copyright holder (presumably, your name)
© 2017 Dave Chesson

What if I use a pen name?

Go ahead and use your pen name on the copyright page in your ebook. Or, alternatively, use your publishing company name. If/when you register your copyright, include your real and pen names on the registration form.

What if I write under my business structure?

If your books are written and/or published under a business structure of some sort, you can list your company as the copyright owner on your copyright page in your ebook. There is no difference in the language if you’re operating as a sole-proprietorship, an LLC, or any other type of business organization.   Use your company address, when listing the publisher contact details. Actually, this can help protect you legally as well as physically as you grow as an author.  To learn more about this, the benefits and how to set it up, check out my article on creating a book publishing company.

2. All Rights Reserved

You can simply state “All rights reserved.” Or you can expound upon that statement, making it clearer and more forceful. Here are a couple of examples:

a. All Rights Reserved Example #1 (Simplest)

All Rights Reserved

b. All Rights Reserved Example #2

All rights reserved, including the right to reproduce this book or portions thereof in any form whatsoever. For information, address the publisher at:

c. All Rights Reserved Example #3

All rights reserved. This book or parts thereof may not be reproduced in any form, stored in any retrieval system, or transmitted in any form by any means—electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, or otherwise—without prior written permission of the publisher, except as provided by United States of America copyright law. For permission requests, write to the publisher, at “Attention: Permissions Coordinator,” at the address below.

Technically, if you have those two Elements (Copyright Notice and “All Rights Reserved”), your book copyright page is complete.

Simplest Book Copyright Example Page Ever!

Here is an example that uses the two elements above in its most simplistic form ever:

© 2017 Dave Chesson. All rights reserved.

Seriously, that’s all you need.

3. Publisher’s Name & Address

The publisher’s address is usually included next so that readers know who and how to contact for reproduction permissions. For many of you, the publisher will be yourself. List whatever way you’d prefer to be contacted for questions or to report an error in one of your books– email, website, business mailing address, etc.

Cloud City Publishing Company1234 Story StreetReadabook, PA 08922www.revowordspublishing.com

www.facebook.com/revolutionarywords

4. Ordering Information

This section includes information for people or organizations wishing to order more copies of your book. Different information may be listed for people looking to make individual orders, bulk orders for bookstores, college classroom orders, etc. Often, this won’t apply to self-published ebooks.

For information about special discounts available for bulk purchases, sales promotions, fund-raising and educational needs, contact Revolutionary Words Publishing Company Sales at 1-866-532-6991 or sales@revowordspublishing.com.

5. Printing Details and Trademarks

Disclose any trademarks your publisher may hold to names, logos or imprints included in your book. Also include any details about your publishing company’s environmentally friendly printing practices, the location of printing, fonts used, etc. Many of these don’t apply to ebooks, however here are some examples:

The Light Saber logo is a trademark of The Republic Publishers, Inc.This book is typeset in Verdana and Courier New.The Republic Publishers, Inc. is concerned with and committed to protecting the galaxy by using environmentally sound printing practices. This book was printed with soy-based ink on recycled paper.Printed in the U.S.A.

6. Your Website

Include your author website, so your readers can easily find more of your work.

Visit the author’s website at www.josiebreitling.com.

7. CIP (Catalog-in-Publication) Data Block

Most self-published ebook authors won’t include a CIP data block. A CIP data block is not something you can create yourself. It is not required to publish or sell a book.

The Library of Congress issues a CIP data block to you. It is not something you can create for yourself. However, if you’re a self-publisher, you are not even eligible to have a CIP data issued to you by the Library of Congress.

You can, however, pay to have a P-CIP (Publisher’s Catalog-in-Publication) data block generated for you, if you truly desire. Having P-CIP data can make your book look more professional. It costs anywhere from $60-$100 and can be done by CIPblock.com.

However, the only people interested in seeing your CIP data are the librarians, quite frankly. CIP data exists to help them categorize (“catalog”) your book in the library more quickly and easily.

Unless you plan to market your book specifically to librarians, CIP data is unnecessary.

For your reference, a CIP data block looks something like this:

Road, Rocky.Ice cream flavors: a complete biographical history by Sloth and Chunk / Rocky Road.p.cm.
ISBN: 938-27929465-1-8Includes biographical references and index.1. Food – Ice cream – Non-fiction. 2. Food flavors – Non-fiction. 3. History of food – 20th century – Non-fiction. 4. Biographies.I. Title.ID197.C0 Y87 2015329/.047—cc26                            9776340872

I really wish this book existed…I would buy it and put it on my coffee table right next to my epic coffee thermos

A side note for Canadian self-published authors: The National Library of Canada will no longer issues a CIP for self-published books.  However, they still offer some free services like ISBNs and others which you can check here. If you're published, you can obtain your free CIP data by filling out their form here.

If you are located elsewhere, check with your country’s local copyright laws.

8. Edition

The edition of your book, especially if it is not the first edition, is a good thing to note here. Simply write:

First Edition

9. ISBNs

List your ISBN, if you have one. Not all books will have one. If you have more than one ISBN, you can list both, for your readers’ reference. Here’s what it will look like:

ISBN 978-1-4767-9386-4 ISBN 978-1-4767-9322-1 (ebook)

Does my book need an ISBN?

That answer varies, depending on where you are going to market your book. It is up to the store selling your book. Here are a few of their (current) answers:

  • Amazon (Kindle): No
  • Barnes and Noble (ePub): Yes
  • Apple iBook (ePub): Yes
  • Libraries and bookstores (print books): Yes

Check out this post to learn more about ISBNs for hardcover books.

Where to get an ISBN

ISBN in the US – http://isbn.org/

ISBN in Canda – http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/publishers/index-e.html

ISBN in the UK – https://www.nielsenisbnstore.com/

ISBN in Australia – http://www.thorpe.com.au/isbn/

ISBN in New Zealand – http://www.natlib.govt.nz/services/get-advice/publishing/isbn

Do I need a separate ISBN for each e-book format?

Yes. You will need separate ISBNs for the different formats of your ebook and your printed book. For example, if you have a Kindle version, an ePub version, a softcover, an audio book, and a hardcover you will need at least four different ISBNs (five, if you want one for your Kindle book too). Go to the ISBN-issuing website here for more details on ISBNs for ebooks.

I’m a self-publisher – can I get an ISBN?

Yes, self-publishers apply for ISBNs, just like any other publisher. All U.S. ISBNs are issued to publishers through a company called Bowker. Go to MyIdentifiers.com to get yours. If you think you’ll be publishing more books (or more versions of your book) down the road, I’d recommend buying a set of 10 ISBNs as a package right away. You’ll get a steep discount that way.

I don’t live in America – can I get an ISBN?

Go to International ISBN Agency to get your ISBN.

10. Disclaimers

An entire book could be written on disclaimers alone. Because our society is increasingly prone to suing at every opportunity, book disclaimers have become a lot more common. Some genres — like investing — might require specific language to stay compliant with the SEC – same goes with health.

For some sample disclaimer language, look inside other books in your genre, which have been published by traditional publishing companies large enough to have a legal staff. Here’s our disclaimer:

We are not lawyers. This website and the content provided herein are simply for educational purposes and do not take the place of legal advice from your attorney. Every effort has been made to ensure that the content provided on this website is accurate and helpful for our readers at publishing time. However, this is not an exhaustive treatment of the subjects. No liability is assumed for losses or damages due to the information provided. You are responsible for your own choices, actions, and results. You should consult your attorney for your specific publishing and disclaimer questions and needs.

Below are two sample disclaimers printed in actual books:

This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents either are the products of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, businesses, companies, events, or locales is entirely coincidental.
Some of the recipes in this book include raw eggs. Raw eggs may contain bacteria. It is recommended that you purchase certified salmonella-free eggs from a reliable source and store them in the refrigerator. You should not feed raw eggs to babies or small kids. Likewise, pregnant women, elderly persons, or those with a compromised immune system should not eat raw eggs. Neither the author nor the publisher claims responsibility for adverse effects resulting from the use of the recipes and/or information found within this book.

A legal disclaimer in your book copyright page doesn’t have to be long. Just do a small amount of homework now, and you could save yourself a lot of trouble down the road.

11. Giving Credit

Here is a good place to give credit to anybody else who made some sort of contribution to your book such as the graphic designer who created your book cover, photographers whose photographs you used, the person who formatted your ebook, your editor, or your proofreaders. Here are some examples:

Ebook formatting by Hynek in Prague, Inc.Cover design by High Fiverr Cover Designer
Illustrations © 2017 The Young PadawanEdited by Luke Skywalker of Master Jedi Editing, LLCScripture quotations are from the New King James Version. Copyright © 1982 by Thomas Nelson. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

What if I want to use a photograph that is public domain – should I disclose that and/or use the PD-US logo on my copyright page?

No, it is not necessary.

12. Printing Numbers (and/or years)

Ever wonder what that strange, long string of numbers float along near the bottom of the copyright page means? They are actually there for the publisher’s production department. They represent the printing number (or sometimes, the printing year). Typically they are in descending order, from left to right. However, they can be in ascending or even in random order. They were originally put there so that printing plates for the book wouldn’t need to be remade with each reprint. The applicable number was simply removed from the plate. However, as digital printing and ebooks take over, these are likely to go extinct.

Side note: These numbers are useful for book collectors. Just look for the lowest number on the list; that’s the printing you have. In the example below, we have a copy from the book’s 2nd printing.

10     9     8     7     6     5     4     3     2     1

Other Copyright FAQs

When is my copyright protection effective?

Your copyright protection goes back to the moment you create the content. We recommend everyone read this brief primer on copyright basics published by the U.S. Copyright Office

Do I need to register my book with the U.S. Copyright Office for my copyright to be effective?

No, you do not. However, there are benefits to doing so. If you register your copyright, you will be able to claim attorney fees and statutory damages, in addition to the actual damages and profits you will get to claim with an unregistered book. You can read more about this at the U.S. Copyright Office’s website. International authors will have to check their country’s own copyright laws.

Do I register for copyright first, or do I submit my published work to Amazon first?

You submit your completed book to Amazon (or other booksellers) first, before registering for your copyright. At the time of writing, books are taking 8-13 months to be processed by the copyright office. There’s a lot of potential profit to be lost in those 8-13 months.

Cheers,

Dave-Signature

104 Comments

  1. Dana on October 1, 2020 at 4:22 am

    Hi Dave, are you still responding to this post? I know it’s old.

    I had an additional question.

    • Dave Chesson on October 3, 2020 at 2:45 pm

      Yup

  2. David Perlow on May 9, 2020 at 7:53 pm

    Thank you for the great, friendly advice! You helped me alot! Just about to publish a book and this helped out a lot! Thanks

    • Dave Chesson on May 9, 2020 at 8:19 pm

      Awesome and glad to have helped!

  3. Robin Reed on November 20, 2019 at 4:23 am

    Always helpful info, Dave. Appreciate you brother!

  4. Ernesto on February 5, 2019 at 3:49 pm

    FYI, the link for Quality Books, Inc. no longer works.

    • Dave Chesson on February 6, 2019 at 4:38 pm

      Good catch. Thanks for the heads up!

  5. Mary E on September 25, 2018 at 12:06 am

    Thank you for this website! I am about to self-publish my first book. I have used Public Domain pictures in the book. I would like to print a disclaimer basically saying that all the pictures in the book are from the public domain. I have done my research on the pictures, but I may have missed something. How do I cover mysef if I have inadvertently used a picture that is not in the public domaim?
    Also, If I apply for a copyright, do I put in the book that it is copyrighted or do I have to wait the 8 to 13 months to put the copyright in the book?
    Thank You
    Mary

    • Dave Chesson on September 25, 2018 at 9:50 am

      Hi Mary. If you were incorrect about it being a public domain, then there is not any verbage you can do that will protect you if the picture is copyrighted. As for applying for a copyright, yes.

  6. Sylvia MacArthur Wells on August 9, 2018 at 2:24 pm

    If we use definitions from a certain dictionary, do we also have to cite that dictionary on the copyright page (per your Giving Credit section)?

    • Dave Chesson on August 9, 2018 at 3:33 pm

      I’m not a lawyer (CYA), but I’ve seen major publications cite a dictionary and not give credit – I actually looked at that once.

      • Sylvia MacArthur Wells on August 10, 2018 at 2:25 am

        Thank you!

  7. Ivan Remus on June 30, 2018 at 1:15 pm

    Hello. If I want to publish on other platforms besides Amazon, Do I need a ISBN? Can I get the ISBN from Canada (Free) instead of USA (Paid)?

    • Dave Chesson on June 30, 2018 at 9:10 pm

      In truth, I’m not a specialist on the ISBNs because I’ve always just used the free one with Createspace or KDP Print.

  8. MarcInGA on June 7, 2018 at 5:23 am

    I’m publishing several anthologies of my short stories. All were written by me and several were published, after which all rights reverted to me. Does any of that have to be shown in the e-book, with or without copyright notices. Also the stories were written and published over years. What date or dates are important.

    • Dave Chesson on June 7, 2018 at 2:28 pm

      The copyright page, and what you put in it, helps to ‘bolster’ arguments if need be. But in truth, the attachment of your publishing account to the book, makes you a owner and many other things can be shown to prove it more so if it ever came to legal blows. So, in the end, putting as much pertinent information into your Copyright Page helps increase your argument if ever you need one.If you ever have a particular question about what should and shoudln’t be included, I love to go find books like mine, and click the “Look Inside” and read theirs (especially when crafted by a well known publishers – because they have the legal team)

      • MarcInGA on June 7, 2018 at 6:52 pm

        Thanks for your advice. Where do I find the books I can look at with the proper pages?

        • Dave Chesson on June 7, 2018 at 7:16 pm

          No problem. Click on the Look Inside of a book, and scroll up (not down). You’ll come across their copyright page if they have one.

  9. Priyanka Agarwal on March 18, 2018 at 6:40 pm

    Hi Dave, great, informative article! Bookmarked it already :)I’m currently polishing my first book–a romance novel based on a bizarre but true incident in my own life. I’ve changed names, altered physical descriptions wherever possible, and in some cases, fused two or more people into one character–all the while staying focused on the requirement of the plot. Obviously, not everyone behaved in a savory manner IRL, and if I portray them as angels, there would not be any story. Some of these people are public figures–I moonlight as a screenwriter–including the protagonist`s love interest. How do I craft an ironclad disclaimer for this?

  10. JUDY BROWN GRADY on February 12, 2018 at 6:45 pm

    I have written a nonfiction book, based on personal experience. It involves real people and I have used their real names. There are no slanderous, false or derogatory statements about the people mentioned in the book. The book will be self published. Do I have to get permission from those mentioned in the story? The book is NOT for sale. It will be available upon request at the cost of printing and shipping. What should I include in the disclaimer statement? If I get a quick copy business the print the book copies, do I include them in the credits page?

  11. John Spencer on February 7, 2018 at 2:55 pm

    I think the image for the 2nd version should be 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 rather than 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1.

  12. Rosie on January 25, 2018 at 9:15 pm

    Great info, thanks! Question though… if I’m writing a fiction novel, but use real places (i.e. cities, restaurants, tourist attractions, etc.) how exactly would I word that in my disclaimer? Something along the lines of “While some of the places and settings in this novel are real, this book is a work of fiction and if any names or incidents in such places resemble any person living or dead, it is strictly coincidental.” Although, I do mention a few people from history. A couple of US Presidents and the like. Your advice is much appreciated.

    • Dave Chesson on January 25, 2018 at 9:22 pm

      Hi Rosie, That is a great question and I’m not sure. However, one thing you could do is look at the inside of a book like “American Gods” where Neil Gaimon did use real places and even brand news as bad guys. I’m sure he`s got an IRONCLAD copyright about that and would serve as a perfect example.

      • Rosie on January 25, 2018 at 9:27 pm

        Thank you! I’ll check it out!

  13. Rosie on January 25, 2018 at 9:15 pm

    Great info, thanks! Question though… if I’m writing a fiction novel, but use real places (i.e. cities, restaurants, tourist attractions, etc.) how exactly would I word that in my disclaimer? Something along the lines of “While some of the places and settings in this novel are real, this book is a work of fiction and if any names or incidents in such places resemble any person living or dead, it is strictly coincidental.” Although, I do mention a few people from history. A couple of US Presidents and the like. Your advice is much appreciated.

    • Dave Chesson on January 25, 2018 at 9:22 pm

      Hi Rosie, that’s a great question and I’m not sure. However, one thing you could do is look at the inside of a book like “American Gods” where Neil Gaimon did use real places and even brand news as bad guys. I’m sure he’s got an IRONCLAD copyright about that and would serve as a perfect example.

      • Rosie on January 25, 2018 at 9:27 pm

        Thank you! I’ll check it out!

  14. Marie Hoping on January 13, 2018 at 3:13 pm

    Thank you, it was very useful. I want to ask about the fiction disclaimer. Can I copy any disclaimer from a book or do I have to create my own?

    • Dave Chesson on January 13, 2018 at 5:19 pm

      haha…a hard question to publicly answer. My public recommendation is to use their disclaimer, but change up the words a little bit.

      • Marie Hoping on January 13, 2018 at 5:56 pm

        Thank you

  15. Marie Hoping on January 13, 2018 at 3:13 pm

    Thank you, it was very useful. I want to ask about the fiction disclaimer. Can I copy any disclaimer from a book or do I have to create my own?

    • Dave Chesson on January 13, 2018 at 5:19 pm

      haha…a hard question to publicly answer. My public recommendation is to use their disclaimer, but change up the words a little bit.

      • Marie Hoping on January 13, 2018 at 5:56 pm

        Thank you

  16. Mary Gravelle on January 11, 2018 at 9:34 pm

    Super helpful… thanks so much!

    • Dave Chesson on January 12, 2018 at 3:25 am

      Thanks and I’m glad you liked it!

  17. Mary Gravelle on January 11, 2018 at 9:34 pm

    Super helpful… thanks so much!

    • Dave Chesson on January 12, 2018 at 3:25 am

      Thanks and I’m glad you liked it!

  18. Chris Doyle on January 7, 2018 at 5:35 pm

    Dave, thank you very much! This resource is greatly appreciated. Quick Q – is your simple copyright example the same and valid for both an ebook download and a print book, i.e. © 2017 Dave Chesson. All rights reserved.?Also, can you point me to a resource that identifies how to give appropriate quote credit when I use a quote from a public figure – either living or dead?Thanks again!

    • Dave Chesson on January 8, 2018 at 2:39 pm

      Yes. As for the quote…not sure. I’ll have to look into that.

      • Chris Doyle on January 8, 2018 at 2:50 pm

        do not knock yourself out. There are a couple of resources out there that describe it fairly well. If you are interested in those links let me know and I will send offline. Thanks again!

  19. Chris Doyle on January 7, 2018 at 5:35 pm

    Dave, thank you very much! This resource is greatly appreciated. Quick Q – is your simple copyright example the same and valid for both an ebook download and a print book, i.e. © 2017 Dave Chesson. All rights reserved.?

    Also, can you point me to a resource that identifies how to give appropriate quote credit when I use a quote from a public figure – either living or dead?

    Thanks again!

    • Dave Chesson on January 8, 2018 at 2:39 pm

      Yes. As for the quote…not sure. I’ll have to look into that.

      • Chris Doyle on January 8, 2018 at 2:50 pm

        Don’t knock yourself out. There are a couple of resources out there that describe it fairly well. If you are interested in those links let me know and I will send offline. Thanks again!

  20. D. Takara Shelor on December 9, 2017 at 7:33 pm

    Wow, what a great resource. Back when I was publishing my first book, it took me a great deal of time to hunt down all this information and get it all figured out … because no one had it in one place. THANK YOU for doing such a thorough job of covering the copyright page.

    • Dave Chesson on December 10, 2017 at 8:25 pm

      Glad you like it and I know what you mean – I did the same thing back when 🙂

  21. Mark Bradford on November 22, 2017 at 10:14 pm

    Dave,

    Great article! I have an LLC for the primary purpose of protecting myself. A couple of questions for you…

    1.) As stated above, I think I can do this, but I just want to clarify. I can use my LLC as the copyright holder, correct? ie: Copyright © 2017 Red Dog Press LLC

    2.) When using pen name, do I have to register a DBA with my LLC?

    I know you’re not a lawyer, but you know what you’re talking about… 🙂

    • Dave Chesson on November 22, 2017 at 11:09 pm

      Hi Mark, As always when answering these, I must state that I am not a lawyer 😉 And here are my answers:
      1. Yup, just make sure that your KDP account has your LLC’s information and your book’s copyright page
      1.5. I personally don’t think so, nor do I do anything more. Amazon has records of publication and attributes the book to you. I personally feel as though I am covered enough.
      3. No. Amazon knows that your LLC is the owner of the KDP account that published that book. They will create the necessary tax forms to show that as well, regardless of the Pen name on the book. The book is owned by the KDP account owner.

  22. Mark Towhey on November 8, 2017 at 8:26 pm

    Great primer!

    One minor point: your printing number example shows a 1st printing, I believe — not a 2nd.

    • Dave Chesson on November 22, 2017 at 11:10 pm

      Oh, thanks! I’ll look into that.

  23. Julie Hoag on November 5, 2017 at 4:26 pm

    My designer/fomatter is telling me I don’t need an ISBN, that is is an unecessary expense. Do you agree? This is my first ebook so I’m trying to figure it out.

  24. Sam Escueta on October 25, 2017 at 7:52 am

    Thank you for this! I’m having a clearer path on my journey to publishing a book.

    P.S I want to apply for Luke Skywalker of Master Jedi Editing! Haha.

    • Dave Chesson on October 25, 2017 at 12:14 pm

      Awesome and glad it helped! And with the other part, may the writing force be with you!

  25. zladyx on September 18, 2017 at 7:03 pm

    Really helpful. Thanks.

  26. Michal on August 17, 2017 at 9:28 am

    “© 2017 Dave Chesson”
    That’s about all I needed for my books (16 published, 30,000+ copies sold).
    Folks! Don’t bother with anything more.

    • Dave Chesson on August 25, 2017 at 8:37 pm

      Yup, which was said in the article….but there are times where more helps.

  27. KB on August 11, 2017 at 12:03 pm

    I’m just about venturing to re publish my Book Mind Process and Formulas in ebook format. Thank Dave for the information which I find useful.

    • Dave Chesson on August 25, 2017 at 8:37 pm

      Awesome and glad to help!

      • KB on September 29, 2017 at 11:50 am

        Sorry it took me so long to reply, but thank U for offering your support

  28. Peter Liptak on August 10, 2017 at 8:48 pm

    Great article Dave… You covered the bases well, but I have one lingering question that I can’t seem to find an answer to. You’ve listed ISBN agencies from other countries (note: many other countries do NOT charge for ISBNs // also the AU link is dead -http://www.thorpe.com.au/isbn/)

    Anyway, I have publishing entities in both the US and South Korea. If i made the ISBNs in Korea, can I use that version of the book here? or do i have to have an ISBN from the US. It seems that Canadian publishers can use their ISBN for sales in the US, but are they weighted differently by bookstores/libraries/etc.?

    Tired of paying top dollar for all my ISBNs and printing two versions for the different countries and now I’m faced with paying to put stickers on each book that i ship here with a new ISBN and price… Thoughts?

    Peter Liptak
    ExilePress.com

  29. SciFi_Fantasy Girl on August 10, 2017 at 3:07 pm

    Thanks for another informative post, Dave! I always wondered what parts I should and shouldn’t include and now I know – and I even learnt about some things I didn’t!!

    • Dave Chesson on August 11, 2017 at 12:54 am

      Awesome and glad to hear it. Yeah, this all started when I started questioning the legitimacy of my page as well.

  30. Tracy Campbell on August 10, 2017 at 12:39 am

    Thank you, Dave, for this detailed copyright information. I’ll be sharing so others will know what to do too! ?

  31. Aloma Adkins on June 22, 2017 at 12:24 am

    Wonderful Article. Great HELP. Thank YOU!!!!

  32. Lolly Peek on May 20, 2017 at 11:41 am

    Very helpful, thanks for making it clear.

  33. Daesung Oppa on April 26, 2017 at 12:09 pm

    Dave,
    Where can I find a copyright example if I am republishing a book from the public domain? I have search high and low but cannot find an example of what the language should look like.

  34. Alo Lo de Fra on April 18, 2017 at 12:21 am

    HI Dave! Thank-you so much for helping me past this big mean giant. I’m in the process of self-publishing my first children’s e-book and have many questions/concerns/doubts. Unfortunately, I don’t have a mentor in this process but landing in your page has alleviated some of that weight. Thank-you!

    • Dave Chesson on April 20, 2017 at 6:22 pm

      Awesome and glad to hear it! That means a lot to hear.

  35. HisHandmaiden on March 24, 2017 at 8:37 pm

    Wow, this is so much GREAT information, all in one place Dave! Thanks for sharing it with those of us who are newbies to the self publishing world. I am writing my first Ebook now and plan to publish it on Amazon, so wish me luck! I hope to publish many, many more in the years to come. I am about to retire from the corporate world, and can’t wait to get started as a self publisher.

    • Dave Chesson on March 24, 2017 at 9:42 pm

      Glad to hear it and good luck with that transition!

  36. Tiffany McGee on March 8, 2017 at 4:56 am

    Hi, I’ve written a children’s book that includes some portraits that my coincidentally resemble 2 deceased famous historical authors and 1 deceased President of U.S.A. Also, this fictitious story takes place in my hometown in which some of the the local attractions and building structures my coincidentally resemble some of the landmarks in my hometown. Can I use the name of the buildings in fictitious pictures? For instance, the local planetarium is named Russel C. Davis Planetarium. Am I allowed to use that on the illustration of the building? How can I assure that I am protected from being sued? I’m actually trying to build the local economy here, increase tourism and give the attractions some acknowledgment but in a fictitious way; and donate a portion of proceeds to a local attraction that is slowly diminishing because of lack of funding. Should I include a disclaimer? Where should the disclaimer be located on the copyright page?

    • Dave Chesson on March 8, 2017 at 3:53 pm

      Hi, you should be fine with the building names – so long as you don’t slander them and make up false claims that could hurt those businesses inside. As for the pictures, you best bet is to make sure the pictures themselves are not copyrighted. If you made the pictures yourself, you’re good to go.

      • disqus_oJK81TDQoh on March 8, 2017 at 4:00 pm

        Thanks! Should I add the disclaimer anyway? If so, does it go before or after the “All rights reserved. No part of this book….”

        • Dave Chesson on March 9, 2017 at 12:21 pm

          You can always do that and yes.

          • disqus_oJK81TDQoh on March 9, 2017 at 3:33 pm

            Thank you! I have one more question for the copyright page. I plan to have a printed version and Ebook version. Do I list the ISBN, ISBN-13 and Ebook ISBN in my printed version, or do I list only the ISBN and ISBN-13 in the printed version? And for the Ebook, Do I list the Ebook ISBN only or would I list all 3 there as well? Just trying to ensure that printed version readers and Ebook readers know that both formats are available, but I don’t want to confuse the matter because I know that ISBNs are set to identify each specific version individually.



  37. HDD Club on March 5, 2017 at 5:05 pm

    Thank you for sharing these tips…

  38. Jomel Kawi on November 10, 2016 at 12:00 pm

    Thank you for sharing Dave. Very helpful in my quest to write my first ebook about Job Seekers Guide. Regards

    JOmel

    http://www.mechaplan.com

  39. Roberto on September 8, 2016 at 1:12 pm

    Hi Dave, Appreciate all the great info. Question: When using my real name and pen name, should they both be included on my copyright page. If yes, is this an acceptable way to do that? © 2016 Roberto R Hernandez / Robonzo Thanks!

    • Dave Chesson on September 9, 2016 at 1:44 am

      Hi Roberto. If you are writing under a LLC or Corporation, then no need to put your name. I have my own LLC…actually two – one for Kindlepreneur, and another for my book’s and online websites. However, if you don’t then my answer will get a little distorted.

      Ideally, you’d want your name as clarification (but this defeats the point of a Copyright claim, right? A lawyer of course (which I am not) would tell you to place both names and then some. However, in truth, Amazon knows that YOU are the owner of the account that published that book. And upon publishing, there is a timestamp as well. So, you should have enough legal protection to put your Pen Name in the Copyright page, but have enough to prove that that is under you based on Amazon records.

      So all of that to say, if it were me and I wrote a book under a pen name and not under a LLC, I’d put the pen name on the CC line. But again, I’m not a lawyer – my lawyer who I consult on these matters tells me to say that…oh lawyers.

      • Roberto on September 15, 2016 at 1:08 pm

        Meant to say so earlier, but thank you!

  40. Tikiri Herath on September 7, 2016 at 3:49 am

    Thanks for this great info What if i’d like to use quotes in my action adventure young adult/girl novels – as a way to separate each section. I always provide the author of the quote right underneath. Is this sufficient? Or do I need to do more.

    Most of the quotes I use are from deceased writers of the past where their work is now in the public domain. But I’d like to use some new author/though leaders’ quotes as well. Will that be a problem?

    PS/ I’m in Canada – not sure if that makes a difference.

    Many thanks in advance!

    • Dave Chesson on September 7, 2016 at 10:53 am

      Hi Tikiri, that’s a good question. In truth, I’m not sure and don’t want to lead you astray. I’ll do some research and check that out.

  41. anomaly1964 on August 31, 2016 at 10:00 pm

    In the process of wanting to publish my first e-book. Will this type of copyright legitimately protect my work? Is it as strong as going through copyright.gov?

    • Dave Chesson on September 1, 2016 at 1:29 am

      I’m no lawyer, so I can’t speak at that level but what I’ve been told by my lawyer is that (And remember they’re very conservative) the more layers of protection you use, the better. But the truth is, the publishing date and even dates of creation on your computer has enough backing to prove a claim (or have in the past) that you created a piece of work before someone else. But adding things like a copyright page is another step/layer or protection, and then registering on copyright.gov is another and so on. As for me, and after that conversation, I only go as far as setting a copyright page. And although I make between 60-80K a year from book sales, it doesn’t warrant enough to me to go even further than that to build more layers of protection with each book. So, that’s the lawyer’s response as well as the decision making I used in the end. I hope that helps!

      • anomaly1964 on September 1, 2016 at 2:42 am

        Thanks for your reply, I really appreciate it…

        Another person echoed what you said about creation date on PC or uploading to a cloud which marks
        Date and Time are good as well…

        Thanks again,

        ALan

  42. Maxine Sunny-Stream Sarr on July 26, 2016 at 1:53 pm

    Thank you. I found the article really helpful.

    • kindlepreneur on July 26, 2016 at 8:12 pm

      Hi Maxine – Thanks! That means a lot to hear!

  43. Angel Garcia on June 6, 2016 at 8:06 pm

    Amazing information Dave. I have a question for you. If I am writing a technical eBook, created by me with my words and technical experience, in which I describe how to use step by step a specific software, do I still have to use “All rights reserved” ? Even though the content is mine, I am talking about a other Company’s software. The software is legally free for personal use, but can I sell an eBook in which I explain how to use the software? Thanks so much!

    • kindlepreneur on June 7, 2016 at 12:12 am

      Hey Angel, you can because you’re providing common information and not subjective information. However, if the company thinks you are misrepresenting them or they just don’t want you and your book, they can always have it taken down. Just make sure you don’t use their logo on your cover AND I’d recommend adding something to your copyright page stating that “So-and-So” is a different company and this is not their official book on the subject nor did they sanction this (I’m sure there are better words). But the point is, you want to ensure that no one will think you are misrepresenting the software or making people think this is an official book of that company.

      • Angel Garcia on June 7, 2016 at 12:24 am

        Hi Dave, thanks so much for your quick answer. I have contacted the vendors, one of them said no problem, but to say what you just say, that I don’t represent the company nor endorse the product, etc etc… so that is what I will do on the Copyright page, put a disclaimer saying that my eBook is for educational purposes and in good faith, and that I do not have any relationship or talk en behalf the of the company, something like that. I really appreciate your help and I am very glad I found your site.

        • kindlepreneur on June 7, 2016 at 12:28 am

          Perfect. I’m actually going to add to my Trello list to add/update the above to discuss that. I’ll put in some more research and create a “lawyer happy” version of that – because that’s a great question. Thanks!

  44. Jun De Vera on April 13, 2016 at 9:46 am

    I am new in this field and it’s my first time to write a book so I am really clueless. Is it ok to put the following even if I don’t register copyright? I mean, I am living in Asia so can I just put that line below without registering, without any thing I need to do or pay?

    © 2016 My Name

    Also, I am not a permanent resident in the country I live and work. I am an overseas working professional. In their rules, only citizens and permanent resident can apply for ISBN. How should I apply then for ISBN?

    • kindlepreneur on April 14, 2016 at 8:10 am

      Techinically, when you publishing something, it is copyrighted. Making that statement in the front page of your book only furthers this. Now, I’m no lawyer, but many court cases have upheld this aspect…even when the person didn’t “register a copyright” for their works. Also, I’m with you…I’m an American citizen, but I live in Sri Lanka. I actually don’t apply for a ISBN. Instead, when I format my book on Createspace, they give me a free one.
      I hope that helps.

  45. […] Book Copyright Page Examples For Your EBook (Kindlepreneur) […]

  46. Stephanie Holland on February 12, 2016 at 11:44 am

    Great post, Dave, thank you! I just created my Copyright Notice in under 10 mins!

    • kindlepreneur on February 12, 2016 at 1:52 pm

      Thanks Stephenie! That was the idea 😉

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dave2

Hey Guys, I’m Dave and when I am not sipping tea with princesses or chasing the Boogey man out of closets, I’m a Kindlepreneur and digital marketing nut – it’s my career, hobby, and passion.

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